Climate change effects ‘can begin in the womb’ warns New York Times opinion piece, pushes for govt. action

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Babies in the womb can be negatively affected Climate changean opinion writer argued in the New York Times Wednesday.

The opinion piece by Jessica Gross was titled “The Effects of Climate Change Could Start in the Womb”. Gross based her claim on a study published in the Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, which tracked children who lived during Hurricane Sandy while in their mothers’ womb, and children who were born before the storm or became pregnant afterwards. According to The Times, the study found elevated psychological problems in children who lived through Hurricane Sandy while still in the womb.

“The study authors found that boys exposed to Sandy in the womb had a high risk of developing ‘attention deficit/disruptive behavioral disorders,’ while girls were at elevated risk for anxiety disorders, depressive disorders and phobias,” Gross wrote.

The New York Times cited studies that found an increased risk of ADHD and anxiety disorders in children who lived through Hurricane Sandy while still in the womb.
(iStock)

In the wake of DOBBS V.

The columnist searched for solutions to the problem because climate change wasn’t “disappearing any time soon – even if humanity suddenly united our collective action and started doing more to mitigate it – and pregnancies would continue to coincide with hurricanes, hurricanes, and floods.”

She reached out to one of the study’s authors who said fathers are not responsible, and called on policy makers to “invest in the communities of children and pregnant women” to study the long-term effects of disasters on children.

But the Times columnist described the other measures as merely “first aid” to solve the problem of climate change. I finally paid for Climate Legislation Eyeliner.

Delaware locals take cover as Hurricane Sandy approaches.

Delaware locals take cover as Hurricane Sandy approaches.
(GT)

“No one can have the onus to fix a problem…While, yes, we can ask for increased screening of babies who have natural disasters in the womb, and that sounds like putting a bandage on a deep wound. A fix for a problem that will fray on our lives and the lives of our children for years to come.” Gross said.

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After citing the inflation-reduction law, Gross suggested that stricter legislation was needed.

“[B]In every delay, there is another disaster, another storm drowning people from their basement dwellings, another generation of parents left to care for children, perhaps not knowing the causes of psychological problems, without the resources to deal with those problems and not doing enough to face the trend of climatic disasters.”

A house burns after Hurricane Ian passed the area on September 29, 2022 in Sanibel, Florida.  The cyclone brought strong winds, storms and rain to the area, causing extensive damage.

A house burns after Hurricane Ian passed the area on September 29, 2022 in Sanibel, Florida. The cyclone brought strong winds, storms and rain to the area, causing extensive damage.
(Joe Riddell/Getty Images)

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After Hurricane Ian hit Florida and South Carolina last month, some in the media have seized the opportunity to raise their concerns about climate change and link them to seemingly unrelated issues.

a Add an article to the paper The storm claimed that Florida was being targeted because Florida Governor Ron DeSantis did not take adequate measures to combat climate change.

Another article in the Washington Post claimed higher temperatures Climate change has led to an increase in hate speech.

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