Florida sheriff’s office makes record fentanyl bust, arrests 3 people trafficking drugs sent from Mexico

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Three suspects were Arrested in Florida In connection with a secret drug smuggling operation in which officials confiscated 11 pounds of fentanyl manufactured in Mexico.

Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd He said it was the largest fentanyl bust in the agency’s history. The amount of the drug was enough to kill 2.7 million people.

According to investigators, fentanyl was manufactured in Mexico and smuggled into the United States to be turned into synthetic tablets and sold on the streets.

The covert operation, which began in September, was carried out in coordination with the Florida Department of Law Enforcement, US Border Patrol, Homeland Security, and the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office.

Drug dealer arrested in Florida death of fentanyl overdose

Three suspects have been arrested in Florida in connection with a secret drug smuggling assault in which officials confiscated 11 pounds of fentanyl manufactured in Mexico.
(DEA)

The Polk County Sheriff’s Office has received information that there is an international drug trafficking organization Smuggling fentanyl from Mexico to Bradenton and then to Polk County.

Undercover investigators arranged to purchase fentanyl from an unknown source in Mexico for $24,000 per kilogram.

The local facilitator of drug purchase, the 28-year-old Ignacio Rodriguez told investigators that the source in Mexico would only deal in large quantities and that the price of the drug fluctuated based on its quality.

Investigators negotiated a $60,000 purchase of fentanyl on September 19.

Rodriguez attended the meeting in Polk County with five kilograms out of six. He had a kilogram stashed in a packet of Cinnamon Toast Crunch and three kilograms stashed in his yellow igloo cooler.

The facilitator then warned the investigators of the dangers of overdose.

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Local facilitator Ignacio Rodriguez attended the meeting with undercover investigators with two kilograms of fentanyl hidden in a can of Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal and three kilograms hidden in a yellow igloo cooler.

Local facilitator Ignacio Rodriguez attended the meeting with undercover investigators with two kilograms of fentanyl hidden in a can of Cinnamon Toast Crunch cereal and three kilograms hidden in a yellow igloo cooler.
(Polk County Sheriff’s Office)

He suggested they wear a mask and gloves, and that they drink milk before taking the medication to help with the tightness in their chests. Rodriguez also told investigators he could sell marijuana, meth and cocaine.

During the investigation, investigators identified two other suspects from North Carolina. Mario Alberto Castro Solace, 29, and Pedro Mondragon, 27, traveled from North Carolina to Polk County on October 11 to meet with undercover investigators about another fentanyl sale.

Castro Solach told investigators that he and the supplier in Mexico wanted to set up a part of the Polk County drug smuggling operation and that he would move to the county and take charge of his own operations. Mexican cartels.

According to investigators, fentanyl was manufactured in Mexico and smuggled into the United States to be turned into synthetic tablets and sold on the streets.

According to investigators, fentanyl was manufactured in Mexico and smuggled into the United States to be turned into synthetic tablets and sold on the streets.
(Fox News)

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Both men were taken into custody on October 12 and told investigators that they were charging money to raise money for a fentanyl drug dealer in Mexico. Castro Solach resides in the country illegally and has a border patrol in the Polk County Jail.

Castro Solach and Mondragon were accused of conspiring to smuggle fentanyl. Mondragon was released on bail on October 17.

Rodriguez was detained by the Manatee County Sheriff’s Office on October 14 on charges of fentanyl trafficking, conspiracy to traffic in fentanyl, possession of a drug-trafficking vehicle, illegal use of a two-way communication device, and possession of drug paraphernalia. He was released from Manatee County Jail on October 15 after paying a $56,500 bond.

“This poison enters the country across the border from Mexico, and we will continue our investigation into Mexican drug cartels that are killing innocent people,” Goode said in a statement.

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